Important – Read About Simon Macbeth | Part 1 of 3

Important – Read About Simon Macbeth | Part 1 of 3

The reverse auction competitions appeared in The Sun newspaper every Wednesday and Friday. My sister, Steph, has only ever been interested in the money side of things, so whenever we got together I’d do the talking and she’d not bother pretending to listen. She’s never wanted to know about the finer points of it all.

The only way the idea could continue to work was if we kept it a secret, if it’s only me who does it. Neither Steph nor I ever told anyone else, apart from one time when she told everyone she met, but more about that later. I might have even told a few people about that one myself. If other people knew what we were doing it wouldn’t have worked, as the competition organisers would have put an end to my little game. Read more

Important – Read About Simon Macbeth | Part 2 of 3

Important – Read About Simon Macbeth | Part 2 of 3

When Wednesday arrived, I was still tempted to try and make something work with the BT phones, but I’d not got back to them about why I’d not paid them the £1500 as agreed. I went to buy a newspaper to see what competition The Sun was advertising and found no trace of a reverse auction anywhere. Part of me was disappointed, but I had some breathing space. There was no immediate pressure now to get the phones working. The following Friday came and there was still no competition, there was nothing in on the following Wednesday or the again the Friday after. The drought went on for a couple of weeks.

I’d won the Mazda at the beginning of June and the cheque arrived in the middle of the month. It took me a couple of days to pay it into the bank. Even important things like that sometimes take me a while to get ‘round to. I’d got the £14k and things were back on track. Read more

Important – Read About Simon Macbeth | Part 3 of 3

Important – Read About Simon Macbeth | Part 3 of 3

I said that we both knew we couldn’t lose. I’d done my research, developed a strategy, tried it, and won. She told me that if I were willing to risk it, then she would be happy to help again. Once that was decided, the thrill of the chase returned.

Some time in July I bought The Sun newspaper and found a competition for an £11k Mini One car. We tackled the auction in exactly the same way as before, even though this time there was a bit of added pressure as there was more at stake – my own money. I was happy to take the risk and had no intention of losing. There was definitely an added edge and more adrenalin the second time around.

It’s like walking. I know now that when I walk I put my feet down on the floor, it’s hard, and my feet rest on the surface until I need them to push me off again. That’s a certainty, but when you are a baby about to take your first steps it’s different. You’ve seen other people walking about the place and know it’s possible, as they don’t disappear through the floor every time they land. When it comes to you making that first move and putting your foot on the same floor, nothing seems that certain anymore. Every instinct you have tells you its safe, but it’s a scary thing until you know it works and you feel the ground safely supporting your every move. The second time you give it a go the fear isn’t there anymore.

Until then, it had felt like an experiment. The risk had been there throughout, even though it had been a fantastic experience. The moment we started bidding on that second auction was when I started running the competitions as a business. I prepared paperwork, kept records, and told Steph that every time she entered text bids in blocks of 50 we would have to go through and check her messages, to confirm each bid had been properly submitted and received.

Whenever we got a unique bid we’d mark it down on a grid sheet. If we were told we had the lowest unique bid, that was even better. We’d keep a record of all of the unique bids, including the lowest unique bid, and make sure we had a cushion of at least 100 unique bids above it.

We did everything methodically, recorded all the information we could to keep ourselves on top of the process and ahead of the game. We were in total control of what we were doing. We’d done the walking and now it was time to run. We were in business and it felt great.